3D map of London tweets created

Two University College London students have created a digital 3D map of London based on the amount of tweets sent from each building.

Stephan Hugel and Flora Roumpani created software that analysed the locations of more than 3,500 London tweets in real-time, slowly increasing the height of the buildings on a map for every tweet that was sent.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, tourist attractions and event spaces ended up the highest after the 16-hour experiment.

The Marble Arch stood tallest, as it was responsible for generating some 63 tweets. According to itv.com, St. Paul’s Cathedral, Kings Cross Station and the British Museum were also ranked as tweet-heavy locations.

Mr Hugel said that the ‘TweetCity’ software could be used to track any location-based data in real-time. In an interview with fastcoexist.com, he revealed that he had higher ambitions for the concept in the future.

“Ideally, rather than showing 24 hours of data, you could show a week, or a month, then track the peaks and troughs. We don’t want to stop with Twitter data, but for our uses Twitter data was the lowest hanging fruit,” he said.

A total of 3,568 data points were used in the experiment, which began on 21:45 on July 1.