How to avoid a boardroom brawl

Making sure tensions don’t spill over when holding a meeting at a conference space could be the difference between reaching a meeting goal or descending into all-out verbal warfare.

As a result, meetings expert Karl Mackie has outlined a few top tips in order to make sure meetings don’t end up with a punch-up.

Mackie suggests that whatever suggestions or insinuations are made during a meeting, taking them personally could harm the goals of the meeting. He believes a disagreement could be about the situation, the language used or just a plain difference in vision, so ‘making it about you’ is the wrong path to take.

In addition, whoever was ‘right’ during the argument doesn’t actually matter in the grand scheme of things.

“What then matters,” he advises, “is ending the fight for the wellbeing of the organisation and for the future. Otherwise others in management, or worse the shareholders, will have to intervene to avoid a damaging meltdown.”

“Conflict can have a very high gravitational pull – it can disproportionately suck up more time and resource than other priorities,” he added, cited by cedr.com.

Furthermore during a meeting, come to an agreement on the points that are closest to the disagreeing parties than work towards finding solutions on ‘what you don’t agree on’.